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Gabinet Okulistyczny N&M foto galeria 1

Łódź, panorama.

Łódź fotogaleria

Łódź, panorama.

LODZ fotogaleria1. EC1 Łódź – City of Culture, a former power plant, 1/3 Targowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria1. EC1 Łódź – City of Culture, a former power plant, 1/3 Targowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria1. Transformers at EC1 Łódź – City of Culture.

LODZ fotogaleria1. EC1 Łódź – a former boiler room. The Łódź Centre of Science and Technology, 1/3 Targowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria1. EC1 Łódź – City of Culture, a former power plant, 1/3 Targowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria2. Manufaktura, entrance gates, 17 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria2. Manufaktura, market place, 17 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria2. Manufaktura, Shopping Centre, service and entertainment centre, formerly Izrael Poznański’s factory. 17 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria2. Art Museum in Łódź ms2, Manufaktura.

LODZ fotogaleria5. Art Museum in Łódź  ms1, formerly Maurice Poznański’s Palace, 36 Więckowski St.

LODZ fotogaleria2. Manufaktura, 17 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria3. The Central Museum of Textiles, formerly Louis Geyer’s White Factory, 282 Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria4. Scheibler’s Lofts, Księży Młyn, formerly Charles Scheibler’s factory, 25 Tymieniecki St.

LODZ fotogaleria6. Charles Scheibler’s house, junction of Adam Próchnik St. & Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria7. The St. Stanisław Kostka Parish Cathedral, 9 ks. Skorupka St., from Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria8. Freedom Square (Plac Wolności), Kościuszko monument, in the background the Church of the Pentecost and National Archives – the former Town Hall.

LODZ fotogaleria9. The Academy of Music, formerly Charles Poznański’s palace, 32 Gdańska St.

LODZ fotogaleria10. St. Alexander Nevsky Orthodox Parish Cathedral, 56 Jan Kiliński St.

LODZ fotogaleria11. Poznański Palace, Museum of the City of Łódź, 15 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria11. Poznański Palace, interior.

LODZ fotogaleria11. Poznański Palace, interior.

LODZ fotogaleria11. Poznański Palace, interior.

LODZ fotogaleria12. Monument of the Łodź factory owners called the Kings of Polish Cotton – Izrael Poznański, Charles Scheibler and Henry Grohman, 30/32 Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria13. Theodore Steigert’s house, 90 Piotrkowska St. In the background: John Petersilge’s ‘Guttenberg house’, 86 Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria14. 146 Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria15. Festiwal Kinetycznej Sztuki Światła, Light. Move. Festival.

LODZ fotogaleria15. Light. Move. Festival.

LODZ fotogaleria15. Light. Move. Festival.

LODZ fotogaleria16. Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria16. Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria17. The City of Łódź Council Offices, formerly Julius Heinzl’s Palace; Tuwim’s bench, 104 Piotrkowska St.

LODZ fotogaleria18. The Izrael Poznański mausoleum, Jewish Cemetery, 40 Bracka St.

LODZ fotogaleria18. The Izrael Poznański mausoleum, Jewish Cemetery, 40 Bracka St.

LODZ fotogaleria18. Jewish Cemetery, 40 Bracka St.

LODZ fotogaleria18. Jewish Cemetery, 40 Bracka St.

LODZ fotogaleria18. Jewish Cemetery, 40 Bracka St.

LODZ fotogaleria19. Sophie Biedermann’s tombstone, the Old Cemetery of the Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession, 43 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria19. Scheibler’s neo-gothic sepulchre and chapel, the Old Cemetery of the Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession, 43 Ogrodowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria20. Radegast train station, Museum of the Independence Traditions, 12 Victims of Litzmannstadt Ghetto Memorial Avenue.

LODZ fotogaleria20. Radegast train station, Museum of the Independence Traditions, 12 Victims of Litzmannstadt Ghetto Memorial Avenue.

LODZ fotogaleria21. Herbst Palace Museum, 72 Przędzalniana St.

LODZ fotogaleria21. Herbst Palace Museum, 72 Przędzalniana St.

LODZ fotogaleria22. Rector’s Office of the Łódź University of Technology, former Reinhold Richter’s villa, Bishop Michał Klepacz Park, 6/8 ks. Skorupka St.

LODZ fotogaleria23. Central tram stop at the W-Z (East-West) route, Mickiewicz Avenue.

LODZ fotogaleria24. The W-Z (East-West) route, Sienkiewicz St. and Mickiewicz Avenue.

LODZ fotogaleria25. The W-Z (East-West) route, Kościuszko Avenue and Mickiewicz Avenue.

Łódź fotogaleria

 

LODZ fotogaleria26. Venue of the 2nd Retina and Glaucoma Symposium OPTHALMOLOGY NEW HORIZONS DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 29 Łąkowa St.

LODZ fotogaleria27. Organiser of the 2nd Symposium OPTHALMOLOGY NEW HORIZONS N&M Eye Clinic, 63/65 Rojna St., 91-167 Łódź

Łódź fotogaleria

HISTORY OF ŁÓDŹ

The village of Łódź first appeared in written records in 1332. 1423 was one of the most important years for Łódź — Wladyslaw Jagiello officially granted town rights to the village of Łódź. Partitions brought enormous changes — Łódź changed its dependence; first it became a part of the Kingdom of Prussia. In 1806 Łódź joined the Napoleonic Duchy of Warsaw and then it became a part of the Congress Kingdom of Poland, a client state of the Russian Empire. It was then decided that Łódź was an ideal place for industry. Industrialists from abroad were coming to Łódź to develop it as the centre of the textile industry. In 1827 the first cotton spinning mill was opened by Krystian Wendisch. Ludwik Geyer came to Łódź one year later. Soon Traugott Grohmann arrived and in 1845 Karol Scheibler settled in Łódź. In 1872 Izrael Poznański started to build his factory complex. Industry development required cheap workers. People from all over Europe were coming to Łódź in search of work. Łódź was to be “the promised land” for them — they wanted to find work, shelter, welfare and happiness for their families there. Instead, districts of poverty started to appear. This was depicted by the Nobel prize winner Wladyslaw Stanislaw Reymont in his novel “The Promised Land”, which was made into a movie by Andrzej Wajda, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1975. 1914 – 1918 were the years of the Ger-man occupation of Łódź. German soldiers destroyed factories, confiscated their equipment, raw materials and finished goods. Poland regained independence in 1918, but Łódź was never to achieve its former position. In August 1919 Łódź voivodship was established with its capital in Łódź. On the 8th September 1939 the German army captured Łódź and another grisly occupation started. In 1940 Germans established a ghetto for Jews (Litzmannstadt Ghetto) — the first ghetto on Polish territory annexed by Nazi Germany. The Łódź Ghetto was closed on the 30th April 1940. Although Łódź was not destroyed during the war, the city still bears the imprint of this period. After the Second World War, from 1945 till 1948 Łódź served as a de facto capital of Poland. History has led to Łódź being called the City of Four Cultures: Polish, Jewish, German and Russian.

FOTO | PHOTO ŁÓDŹ – Paweł Augustyniak, Tymoteusz Lekler,  GRAPHIC DESIGN – Aleksandra Kasjańska